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Lawton, OK Daycare
The Curriculum
Early Infants

Mobile Infants

Toddler

Nursery School

Pre-K 3-Year Olds

Pre-K 4-Year-Olds

Kindergarden

Summer Camp

Additional Programs

 

Early Infant

6 weeks to walking depending on your child's development

This is an amazing time in your child's life. Every day brings a new gift - a smile, a new word, a new tooth. At Brick Rainbow Kids, we attend to your infant's every need and we listen carefully to you - the parent - so that your needs are met as well. We maintain a stimulating environment in the infant room, but there's also quiet time and nap time. The schedule is determined by your child, not by us. Since an infant's day is "on demand", there's no such thing as a typical day. This will give you an idea of what your very young infant might experience.

Our curriculum addresses an infant's growth and development by creating strong bonds and learning through play. Understanding how young children learn is essential to providing an environment which supports an infant's development.


Curriculum

Nothing is more important than meeting an infant's "on demand" schedule. Our nurturing caregivers weave a learning curriculum into an infant's individual need to sleep, eat and to just be held. The simple act of bonding and connecting develops a child's ability to trust. Each week, all areas of development are covered by introducing appropriate activities.

Every interaction is another opportunity to learn and develop. Motor, intellectual, social and language development are all closely intertwined. Infants need opportunities to use their bodies freely in order to learn about space, movement and the effects their actions have on objects and the people around them. Language development evolves from giggles to vocalization through imitation.

Our developmental program, Lifetime Learners, includes enrichment programs in Infant Sign Language, Musical Beginnings, Developmental Milestone and Reading Readiness. We also incorporate key elements from the Creative Curriculum for Infants and Toddlers (one of five curriculums approved by the New Jersey State Dept. of Education) which focus on intentionally teaching through play.

Understanding how young children learn is essential to providing an environment which supports their development. We address an infant's growth and development by creating strong bonds, encouraging learning through play and also by stimulating their five senses through ordinary interaction throughout the day.

"Touch" and large motor skills could be enhanced by rolling a ball back or finger-painting with yogurt and playing with items such as cooked spaghetti. "Sight" could be stimulated by primary-colored pictures at baby infant-eye level and contacted directly on tables to enhance their ability to focus and touch. "Hearing" is not only done through the soothing music played in the room and the Musical Beginnings program, but also through story time and the continuous naming of objects in the room. Meal-times are great opportunities to encourage "Taste" and "Smell" as infants get older.

Exploration is key for infants as they are striving to make sense of the world around them. Our infant rooms are the perfect environment for little ones to discover their bodily powers as they learn to move, pull up and roll over. You will be amazed as your little ones progress from seeing to looking, smelling to sniffing, hearing to listening, feeling to touching, and from being held to moving around.

 

Developmental Milestones

SENSORY
Explores hands orally and tactually
Explores rattle with mouth
Explores objects and surfaces
Localizes the source of a sound toy
Grasp reflex
Looks toward a light

PERCEPTION/FINE MOTOR
Tracks moving objects
Glances from one thing to another
Looks at and reaches for objects
Holds two objects at one time
Supports head and chest with arms
Switches an object from one hand to another
Clumsy pinch beginning
Grasps dangling object
Plays with things by banging them on a hard surface
Drinks from a cup with assistance
Attempts to pick up a small object by "raking"
Grasps raisin or small food piece between thumb and forefinger
Pokes with fingers
Bites and chews
Attempts to scribble

MOVEMENT IN SPACE
Holds head in midline when lying on back
Lifts head when placed on stomach
Rolls from side to back
Rolls from tummy to back
Clasps hands together
Holds a rattle briefly
Rolls independently
Helps while being pulled to a sitting position (head doesn't fall back)
Kicks legs in a bicycle motion
Holds head erect and steady when held in a sitting position
Holds onto a rattle
Sits briefly without support
Sits with support for up to 30 minutes
Bounces when held in a standing position
Raises head while lying on back
Grabs and plays with feet
Sits briefly without support
Drop things on purpose
Rocks when on hands and knees
Gets into a sitting position
Pulls up to a standing position
Creeps or crawls forward five feet
Stands alone briefly
Helps in the dressing process by extending arms or legs
COGNITIVE
Visually inspects hands while moving them
Brings things to mouth
Searches briefly for object at point of disappearance
Looks down for objects that have been dropped
Looks for an object that has disappeared from sight
Plays with two objects that relate to each other

LANGUAGE
Cries when wet or hungry
Makes occasional throaty noises
Uses different cries to communicate different needs
Vocalizes in response to a person smiling and talking
Imitates three sounds made by an adult
Responds to names, persons, objects, and events
Shrieks to get attention
Looks at pictures in books

SOCIAL
Cries or is startled when hearing unexpected voices
Ceases crying when seeing a face, hearing a voice, or being held
Smiles at the approach of a family member
Plays "peek-a-boo"
Waves "bye - bye" when requested "bye-bye"
Enjoys looking in mirror
Imitates facial expressions
Shows fear of strangers
Holds out a toy to another person but will not share it
Ceases activity when told "no"

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Mobile Infant

Walking to 18 months
Walking. Climbing. Exploring.

Suddenly, everything about your child's life is changing. By acquiring mobility, your little one experiences the world in a whole new way, making movement and related milestones an important component of our older infant program.

But movement is only one aspect of a varied curriculum that promises to stimulate and nurture very young minds and bodies. Learn more about a typical day (even though every day is a new adventure for an mobile infant).


Curriculum

Our developmental program, Lifetime Learners, includes enrichment programs in Infant Sign Language, Musical Beginnings, Developmental Milestone and Reading Readiness. We also incorporate key elements from the Creative Curriculum for Infants and Toddlers (one of five curriculum's approved by New Jersey State Dept. of Education) which focus on intentional teaching through play.

Our curriculum addresses an infant's growth and development by creating strong bonds and encouraging learning through play. Understanding how young children learn is essential to providing a child care environment which supports an infant's development.

Children's developmental growth is reinforced through teacher-led play. For example, when focusing on a "Farm Animals" theme, the song of the week could be Old MacDonald, the books read could be Barnyard Dance or Down on the Farm, the plush toys could be animals found on a farm. Teachers could play auditory and visual games, such as making animal sounds and role-playing different animals and sensory exploration for "soft" could focus on the feel of cotton balls while "baaing" like a sheep.

The mobile infant who is starting to crawl depends on a sense of security as a base for strong interest in exploration. Exploration is key for infants as they are striving to make sense of the world around them. They are progressing from hearing to listening, feeling to touching, and from being held to moving around. And our infant rooms are the perfect, safe environments for little ones to discover their bodily powers as they learn to move, pull up and roll over.

The infant caregivers lovingly implement activities to enable children to bond and connect - developing from having only instinctual behavior to learning basic trust. Our caregivers encourage language development from giggles to vocalization through imitation.

Every interaction is another opportunity to learn and develop. Motor, intellectual, social and language development are all closely intertwined. For example, infants need opportunities to use their bodies freely in order to learn about space, movement and the effects their actions have on objects and the people around them.

Each week, all areas of development are covered by introducing appropriate activities that address each infant's individual needs. As an infant matures, their schedule tends to become more structured and organized. Nurturing caregivers weave the activity plans into the child's needs to sleep, eat and to just be held.

 

Developmental Milestones

PERCEPTION/FINE MOTOR
Learn to clap hands
Put things in and out of containers
Scribble
Be able to use a spoon
Start drinking from a cup
Starts to brush teeth
Completes a project by tearing paper

MOVEMENT IN SPACE
Pull self up to a standing position
Bend over and pick up an object
Walks up steps
Kicks a ball
Throws a ball
Walks on tip toe

COGNITIVE
Provide interesting surroundings
Body parts (one or two)
Knows own name when spoken
Follows a one step command
Builds a tower
Enjoyment of books
Learns uses for objects
Stacks objects by size
LANGUAGE
Uses different sounds and voice levels
Uses a few words
Listens to short stories and songs

SOCIAL
Takes turns with others
Uses a mirror to watch own movements
Plays next to others
Enjoys being with people

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Toddler
18 - 24 months
Running. Dancing. Talking.

Suddenly, everything about your child's life is changing. By acquiring mobility and speech, your little one experiences the world in a whole new way, making language and related milestones an important component of our young toddler program.

But language is only one aspect of a varied curriculum that promises to stimulate and nurture very young minds and bodies. Learn more about a typical day (even though there's really no such thing as a typical day for a young toddler). Children ages 18 months to two years develop faster than almost any other age group.

 
 

Curriculum

 

Learning through play is the key to building a desire for learning in a young toddler! Our curriculum addresses young toddlers' growth and development by closely following their readiness cues. As your child displays interest and signs of emerging skills, he or she is encouraged to move toward the next challenge.

 
 

Our developmental program,Lifetime Learners, includes enrichment programs forInfant Sign Language, Musical Beginnings, Developmental Milestone and Reading Readiness. We also incorporate key elements from theCreative Curriculum for Infants and Toddlers(one of five curriculum approved by New Jersey State Dept. of Education) which focus on intentional teaching through small group interactions.

Your child's developmental growth is reinforced through teacher-led play. For example, when focusing on a "Crawl & Fly" theme, the song of the week could bePretty Butterfly, the book read could beVery Hungry Caterpillar, and the games could include crawling like anInchworm. Art projects could entail creating cocoons from cotton balls and creating hand-print butterflies from coffee filters. Children could also enjoy watching the butterflies in the garden, imitating them by flitting around the playground while searching for leaves to "feed" them.
 

Lesson plans are designed to address each of the developmental areas including: Sensory & Perception, Language & Communication, Personal & Social, Creativity & Arts, Physical, and Cognitive.

 
 

Brick Rainbow Kids teachers are warm and supportive, directing children to play safely and to also learn what is appropriate behavior in social situations - a key area of development for this active age group.

 
 

Classrooms are center-based learning environments that channel children's abundant energy into various activities. They move through these areas as they explore, discover and expand their interests. Examples of some areas are: Dramatic Play Center, Family Center, Transportation Center , Building Center, Reading Center and Computer Center. These learning areas are filled with fun and age-appropriate puzzles, manipulatives, games and toys.

 
 

Developmental Milestones

 
MOTOR SKILLS
Moves around room unaided
Puts in and takes out objects from a container.
Moves to music
Plays simple musical instruments.
Helps dress and undress self.
Rolls a ball.
Drinks from a cup
Walks upstairs with help
Turns two or three pages at a time
Tries to kick a ball
Pushes, pulls, or carries a toy while walking
Uses a spoon to scoop

COMMUNICATION SKILLS
Copies a few simple sounds or actions
Uses one-word sentences
Knows a few words
Uses some words correctly such as "mama", "uh oh", and "no"
Understands many words and simple directions
Acts out familiar verbs such as "sit", "jump", "run", etc.

COGNITIVE SKILLS
Does simple imaginative play
Enjoys looking at books
Retrieves a ball that rolls out of sight
Notices differences in temperature, taste, and smell
Tries to sing songs
Enjoys messy play such as finger painting
Points at and/or names familiar objects
Stacks two or more things
Labels familiar things
Begins to understand color, size, and shape
Explores without putting things into mouth
Matches similar objects
Puts one to six round pegs into pegboard


PERSONAL-SOCIAL SKILLS
Uses some gestures, such as waving "bye-bye"
Hands a toy back to an adult
Enjoys doing the same thing over and over
Hugs and kisses people they like
Knows self in mirror
Shows one body part when asked
Talks on a real telephone

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Nursery School

Sippy cups, learning to share, and the not so "terrible twos" are all a part of this wonderful but sometimes challenging period in your child's life. By promoting independence and developing their emerging awareness of social behavior, we help your two year old discover life beyond their own little world. Your child is a person now, well past the infant stage, and our curriculum reflects that. Although your child's favorite word may be "No!" it will soon be replaced with "Why?" and lots of other new words as language develops during this critical year.


Curriculum

Our Nursery or Early Preschool curriculum incorporates the first steps necessary to prepare children for preschool, kindergarten and beyond! This program begins moving from child care toward a more structured educational format in preparation for preschool as children expand their ability to sit and listen for longer periods of time.

 
 

Our developmental program,Lifetime Learnersincludes enrichment programs forInfant Sign Language, Musical Beginnings, Developmental Milestone and Reading Readiness. We also incorporate key elements from theCreative Curriculum for Preschool(one of five curriculum approved by New Jersey State Dept. of Education) which focus on intentionally teaching through small group interactions.

 
 

Developmental growth is reinforced through teacher-led play. For example, when focusing on a "Dinosaurs" theme featured activities and lessons could be:

 
 

Song:We Are the Dinosaurs-Marching, Marching
Book:Dinosaur Dig
Arts & Crafts:Creating a paper plate Stegosaurus
Math: Graph Your Favorite Dinos
Science: Digging for Dinos in the Sand

 
 

Two-year-olds will participate in hands-on activities while learning how to solve problems by creating solutions - all by themselves! Working independently, participating in teacher-directed activities and as part of a small peer group builds their confidence and self-esteem while fostering their ability to communicate their own likes and dislikes.

Every child is treated as an individual and encouraged to follow their unique developmental path. As your child shows an interest in potty-training, teachers will partner with parents in helping children to accomplish this important milestone. Consistency is a key to potty-training and an encouraging environment exists to support you and your child during this sometimes frustrating period.

 
 

Lesson plans are designed to address each of the developmental areas including: Sensory & Perception, Personal & Social, Creativity & Arts, Physical, Cognitive, and Language & Communication.

 
 

The American Sign Language program is continued and advances your child's language development. Two-year old children often use sign language simultaneously with speech to express their thoughts and feelings.

 
 

Classrooms are center-based learning environments. Children move through these areas as they explore, discover and expand their interests. Examples of some areas are: Dramatic Play Center, Family Center, Transportation Center, Building Center, Reading Center and Computer Center. These learning areas are filled with fun and age-appropriate puzzles, manipulatives, games and toys.

 
 

Learning is not just limited to the classroom. Brick Rainbow Kids facilities have large outdoor playgrounds and often indoor gyms for little one's to run, jump and slide their way to physical fitness and gross motor skill development.

 

It may look like child's play to you, but there's a lot of work going on behind the scenes! Social development advances while critical thinking and rationalization skills become more sophisticated. Stimulating and fun activities are used to develop a life-long love of learning.

 
 

Developmental Milestones

 
MOTOR SKILLS
Runs forward well
Jumps in place with two feet together
Stands on one foot with aid
Walks on tiptoe
Kicks ball forward
Throws large ball
Balances on balance board momentarily with both feet
Strings four large beads
Turns pages one at a time
Begin to, with help, snip with safe scissors
Uses one hand consistently
Folds paper in half with demonstration
Imitates circular, vertical, and horizontal strokes
Paints with some wrist action, makes dots, lines, and circular strokes
Scribbles with large markers or crayons and uses paints and brushes
Rolls, pounds, and squeezes clay
Constructs with construction toys (Lego, Tinkertoys)
Turns handle on a jack-in-the-box
Clips clothespins on a can
Moves to music and plays simple instruments
Puts tiny things into tiny openings
Builds a two to four block train or stacks three to six cubes when shown how
Walks up and down stairs
Jumps off one step
Catches a large ball thrown from very close
Jumps in place

COMMUNICATION SKILLS
Points to pictures of common objects
Identify objects when told their use
Understands negatives such as "no", "don't", and "can't"
Enjoys listening to simple storybooks and requests them to be repeated
Labels common objects and pictures
Uses two or three word phrases
Gives first and last name
Asks "what" and "where" questions
Makes negative statements such as "can't open it "
Shows frustration at not being understood
Has a three or four hundred word vocabulary
Uses own name and names of others
COGNITIVE SKILLS
Responds to simple directions such as "Give me the ball".
Selects and looks at picture books on his own
Names pictured objects
Knows concepts of one, many, and more
Understands prepositions to and with
Does a puzzle placing a circle, square and triangle into its proper place
Can nestle cups sequentially
Points to six body parts on a doll
Groups associated objects such as a cup and saucer
Stacks rings on peg in size order
Can talk briefly, about what he is doing
Imitates adult actions such as sweeping and ironing
Learning is through exploration and adult direction
Begins to understand functional concepts of objects (spoon is for eating)
Remembers where things are kept
Pretend play with familiar things
Sings easy songs
Says easy rhymes
Listens to a five-minute story with pictures
Points to a picture that shows the action named
Tells which is one or many, big, or little when asked
Answers easy questions that ask what, how, where, or why
Repeats two digits in order

PERSONAL-SOCIAL SKILLS
Plays near another child (parallel play)
Uses spoon with little spillage
Gets drink from fountain or faucet independently
Opens door by turning handle
Takes off coat
Puts on coat the "magic" way
Washes and dries hands with assistance
Defends own possessions
Begins to play house
Uses objects symbolically
Participates in simple small group activities
Sings simple songs and plays simple games
Knows gender
Increasing sense of independence
Generally does as told
May have fears (thunder, sirens, loud noises)
May enjoy performing for others
Helps put things away
Gets dressed with help

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Pre-K 3

Learning letters. Using scissors. Getting their own crayon boxes. Asking questions. Your three-year-old will be acquiring important skills for learning - not the least of which is the ability to sit and listen! View our thematically-based curriculum in which learning objectives are advanced along with your child's development.

By promoting hands-on activities while reinforcing independence skills such as washing those hands after using the potty, we help your child make great strides during this important year.

 
 

Curriculum

 

Preschool is a wonderful opportunity to allow children the freedom to develop and grow in independence and confidence. The social skills necessary to succeed in a kindergarten environment begin to come into focus as children expand their ability to sit and listen for longer periods of time. Little things mean a lot, getting your own crayon box and using the bathroom "all by myself" are examples of how responsibility is instilled in this age group.

Our Preschool curriculum,Lifetime Learners, includes enrichment programs forInfant Sign Language, Musical Beginnings, Developmental Milestone and Reading Readiness. We also incorporate key elements from theCreative Curriculum for Preschool(one of five curriculums approved by New Jersey State Dept. of Education) which focus on intentionally teaching through small group interactions. The Preschool program advances in learning objectives from Pre-K 3 and through Pre-K 4.

Developmental growth continues to be reinforced through teacher-led play. For example, when focusing on a "Sensational Seed" theme featured activities and lessons could be:

Song of the Week:A Seed Song
Book:The Seasons of Johnny's Apple Tree
Arts & Crafts: From Seed to Sprout fingerpainting
Math: Seed Packet Matching
Science: We eat seeds!

Our preschool curriculum is thematically based and geared toward large and small group activities which focus on each child's individual abilities and needs. Children are divided into Pre-K 3 and 4 classrooms and learning objectives are advanced along with the child's development. There is ‘buzz in the air' as constant hands-on and teacher-led activities encourage learning as fun, because preschoolers learn best when active participation is the focus.

Theme-based units and concepts become more complex as children advance from Pre-K 3 level into Pre-K 4. Learning is brought to life under their teacher's guidance such as "playing" post office and writing to pre-school pen pals in other states while learning about those states.

An important aspect of our curriculum is the exclusive Rainbow Academy Reading Readiness program. This begins in Pre-K 3 and continues to become more advanced through Pre-K 4. This program is designed to give each child the opportunity to learn the skills that are key building blocks to becoming a strong reader. Unlike phonetic-based programs which focus on only one aspect of the reading process, our Reading Readiness program is a ‘whole language approach." Being literacy-based, the program motivates and encourages young children, while offering all of the opportunities they need to develop into life-long readers.

The second aspect of the Pre-K curriculum - science, math, and social studies - is approached with hands-on activities that engage children's curiosity through exploration.

Lesson Plans are designed to address each of the developmental areas including: Sensory & Perception, Language & Communication, Personal & Social, Creativity & Arts, Physical, and Cognitive.

Our classrooms are center-based learning environments. Children move through these areas as they explore, discover and expand their interests. Examples of some areas are: Dramatic Play Center, Family Center, Transportation Center, Building Center, Reading Center and Computer Center. These learning areas are filled with fun and age-appropriate puzzles, manipulatives, games and toys.

The Pre-K program will help to ensure that when your child graduates from Brick Rainbow Kids, they will love learning andeasilyandconfidentlyassimilate into elementary school.

 
 

Developmental Milestones

MOTOR SKILLS
Walks up stairs, holding rail, alternating feet
Runs around obstacles
Balances on one foot for several seconds
Hops on one foot
Pushes, pulls, steers wheeled toys
Rides a tricycle
Uses slide without assistance
Jumps over 6" object landing with both feet together
Throws ball overhead
Catches a bounced ball
Fastens snaps
Builds a nine to twelve block tower
Drives nails and pegs
Copies a circle
Copies a cross
Rolls and shapes clay forms
Strings ½ inch beads
Cuts across a strip of paper
Completes a ten piece form-board

COMMUNICATION SKILLS
Begins to understand time concepts such as "tomorrow we will"
Understands big and bigger, long and short
Understands relationships expressed by "if….then" and "because…"
Carries out a series of two to four related directions
Understands when told, "Let's pretend"
Has a vocabulary of more than one thousand words
Understands some abstract words
Answers questions
Tells about experiences
Uses plurals
Uses -ed on verbs to indicate past tense
Uses pronouns "I" and "me" to refer to self
Repeats a nursery rhyme and sings songs
Repeats three digits in order
Speech is understandable to strangers but continues to contain some errors
Sentences are four to five words long
Used prepositions in, under, and on
COGNITIVE SKILLS
Recognizes and matches five colors
Works a three to five piece puzzle
Intentionally stacks blocks on rings by size order
Builds a three-block bridge
Draws a somewhat recognizable picture
Names and briefly explains pictures that he/she has drawn
Counts three objects
Knows gender and age
Knows first and last name
Learns through observing and imitating adult actions
Has increased understanding of functions and groupings of objects
Puts two halves together to form a simple picture
Comprehends concept of same and different
Matches geometrical forms
Begins to be aware of the concepts past and present

PERSONAL-SOCIAL SKILLS
Eats independently with minimal assistance
Brushes hair independently
Pours from a pitcher to a cup
Spreads butter with a knife
Buttons and unbuttons large buttons
Washes hands independently
Uses tissues with a reminder
Uses toilet independently
Puts on shoes and socks (without tying)
Brushes teeth
Joins in play and interacts with other children
Takes turn and shares with encouragement
Tries to help with chores (sweeping)
Begins dramatic play

 

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Pre-K 4

Learning words. Tracing letters. Measuring in cooking class. (and having fun doing all of those things) are setting the stage for comprehension in these areas. With kindergarten around the corner, four-year-olds are getting ready for the big time! We continue with our thematically-based curriculum in which learning objectives are advanced along with the child's development.

But we never lose sight of the fact that your four-year-old is still a preschooler, and we shape our curriculum and our expectations with that in mind. By continuing with hands-on activities, we help your child make great strides during this pivotal year. See how reading readiness as well as physical development are emphasized in a typical day.

Curriculum

 

Preschool is a wonderful opportunity to allow children the freedom to develop and grow in independence and confidence. The social skills necessary to succeed in a kindergarten environment begin to come into focus as children expand their ability to sit and listen for longer periods of time. Little things mean a lot, getting your own crayon box and using the bathroom "all by myself" are examples of how responsibility is instilled in this age group.

 

Our Preschool curriculum,Lifetime Learners, includes enrichment programs forInfant Sign Language, Musical Beginnings, Developmental Milestone and Reading Readiness. We also incorporate key elements from theCreative Curriculum for Preschool(one of five curriculums approved by New Jersey State Dept. of Education) which focus on intentionally teaching through small group interactions. The Preschool program advances in learning objectives from Pre-K 3 and through Pre-K 4.

 

Developmental growth continues to be reinforced through teacher-led play. For example, when focusing on a "Sensational Seed" theme featured activities and lessons could be:

Song of the Week:A Seed Song
Book:The Seasons of Johnny's Apple Tree
Arts & Crafts: From Seed to Sprout fingerpainting
Math: Seed Packet Matching
Science: We eat seeds!

 

Our preschool curriculum is thematically based and geared toward large and small group activities which focus on each child's individual abilities and needs. Children are divided into Pre-K 3 and 4 classrooms and learning objectives are advanced along with the child's development. There is ‘buzz in the air' as constant hands-on and teacher-led activities encourage learning as fun, because preschoolers learn best when active participation is the focus.

 

Theme-based units and concepts become more complex as children advance from Pre-K 3 level into Pre-K 4. Learning is brought to life under their teacher's guidance such as "playing" post office and writing to pre-school pen pals in other states while learning about those states.

 

An important aspect of our curriculum is the exclusive Brick Rainbow Kids Reading Readiness program. This begins in Pre-K 3 and continues to become more advanced through Pre-K 4. This program is designed to give each child the opportunity to learn the skills that are key building blocks to becoming a strong reader. Unlike phonetic-based programs which focus on only one aspect of the reading process, our Reading Readiness program is a ‘whole language approach." Being literacy-based, the program motivates and encourages young children, while offering all of the opportunities they need to develop into life-long readers.

 

The second aspect of the Pre-K curriculum - science, math, and social studies - is approached with hands-on activities that engage children's curiosity through exploration.

 

Lesson plans are designed to address each of the developmental areas including: Sensory & Perception, Language & Communication, Personal & Social, Creativity & Arts, Physical, and Cognitive.

 

Our classrooms are center-based learning environments. Children move through these areas as they explore, discover and expand their interests. Examples of some areas are: Dramatic Play Center, Family Center, Transportation Center , Building Center, Reading Center and Computer Center. These learning areas are filled with fun and age-appropriate puzzles, manipulatives, games and toys.

 

The Pre-K program will help to ensure that when your child graduates from Brick Rainbow Kids, they will love learning andeasilyandconfidentlyassimilate into elementary school.

 
 

Developmental Milestones

COMMUNICATIONS SKILLS
Follows three unrelated commands in sequence
Understands comparatives like pretty, prettier, and prettiest
Listens to long stories but may misinterpret the fact
Incorporates verbal directions into play activities
Understands more abstract words
Understands sequencing of events "first we will go to…. Then we will go to…."
Asks when, how, and why questions
Joins sentences together
Uses because and so to indicate causality
Tells content of story but may confuse the facts
Comprehends positions such as at the side of, in front of, between
Comprehends questions like "what do we do when we are tired?"
Identifies common opposites such as hot and cold
Repeats five word sentences
Retells a fairy tale in logic sequence

 

COGNITIVE SKILLS
Works puzzles with ten to fourteen pieces
Counts three items meaningfully
Plays with words: repetitions, rhyming, nonsense words.
Points to and names six colors
Matches pictures of things that go together (shoe-sock)
Draws a person with up to six recognizable parts
Can name many body parts in a picture or on self
Draws, names, and describes a recognizable picture
Counts by rote to ten
Knows own street, town and possibly phone number
Understands concepts of day and night
Answers questions such as "What are your eyes for?"
Has longer attention span
Learns through observing and listening to adults as well as through exploration
Continues to be easily distracted
Has increased understanding of the concepts of function, time, and whole-part relationships
May state function or use of an object in addition to their names
Understands more time concepts including yesterday, last week and a long time ago.
Matches dominos and lotto cards
Comprehends one-to-one correspondence
Understands the concepts of two and three
Matches letter shapes and number cards

PERSONAL-SOCIAL SKILLS:
Cuts easy food with knife
Laces shoes
Buttons medium to small buttons
Toilets and dresses self
Distinguishes front and back of clothing
Washes face well
Hangs up coat
Engages a zipper
Puts toys away and cleans up
Plays and interacts with other children with minimal friction
Dramatic play is closer to reality with attention to detail, time, and space
Enjoys playing dress up
Shows interest in exploring gender differences
Separates readily from mother
Uses play materials correctly
Attends well for stories
Enjoys being part of a group
Accepts responsibilities

 

MOTOR SKILLS

Walks backward heal to toe
Jumps forward ten times without falling
Turns somersaults
Walks up and down stairs with alternating feet
Gallops
Walks full length of balance beam or walking board
Catches a rolled ball
Cuts continuously on a line
Copies a cross and a square
Prints a V and an H
Imitates a six cube pyramid
Matches simple patterns

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Kindergarten

Beginning to read. Telling time. Adding and subtracting numbers. Kindergarten is an exciting milestone for your five year old, and our full day kindergarten program will more than meet your expectations.

Since your kindergartner will be preparing for first grade, we understand your concerns about readiness for elementary school. And when graduation time comes, we think you'll agree your child has a considerable advantage, coming from Brick Rainbow Kids.

While continuing our philosophy of "learning is fun," our degreed teachers follow a diverse and detailed curriculum that meets yet strives to exceed all New Jersey state requirements. Young minds are stimulated by bringing lessons to life with hands-on activities which are incorporated as part of the kindergarten learning centers.

Comprehension is key while kindergartners advance from words to reading and from counting to addition, but academics is not our only focus. Life skills are also reinforced such as respect, honesty and sharing with others. We continue with our thematically-based curriculum in which learning objectives are advanced along with the child's development.


Curriculum

The need for a high caliber kindergarten program coupled with extended before and after care is a necessity for many working parents, and our extended day kindergarten programs offer the best of both worlds.

Private full-day kindergarten allows teachers the freedom to spend more time with children, to address their individual needs and to expand on all learning areas well beyond just the basics. Kindergarten is fun because learning comes alive!

The Three "R's" and Beyond

Reading and Language
The reading and language curriculum for kindergarten utilizes the McCracken Grow into Reading program.

Twelve core beliefs serve as the framework:

Language exists to express meaning.

Language skills evolve from trying to make sense of the speech and print of the world into which we are born.

Literacy skills improve through practice.

There is no absolute sequence in which skills are learned or need to be taught.

Language-learning is a responsive, social, non-competitive process.

The minimum text that can be used to teach reading is the whole book, chapter, poem or story. Children read whole stories and poems before they recognize words.

There is no disintegration of language into components for daily teaching.

Reading is done through comprehension. The brain directs the eye to make sense of a mass of text.

All children go through the same stages in learning to read and write.

All children must be read to on a regular basis.

Almost all children are capable of literacy if they do not become confused or frustrated in learning how print works. Almost all children require direct, sensitive teaching to learn how print works.

Children must see, hear, and use language.


Writing
Your kindergartener will progress developmentally from talking to drawing to writing through the use of journaling. Children open their imaginations to interpret how their own writing makes them feel.

Early in the year, they start with pictures and dictation (the teachers write the words), and their skills gradually improve. Soon they are making lists, copying words, and doing shared writing with the teachers. By the end of the school year, most children are writing sentences in their journals using sight words, phonetic spelling, and their dictionaries.

Mathematics
The mathematics curriculum for kindergarten utilizes the Houghton MifflinEvery Day Counts Calendar Mathprogram. This interactive program is designed to capitalize on daily discussions and to foster children's mathematical confidence and competence while appealing to the natural way children learn. The program is based on years of teaching and is supported by research that shows:

Children need to learn mathematics incrementally, giving them the opportunity to develop understandings over time.

Models help children visualize and verbalize number and geometric relationships.

Classroom discussion fosters the growth of language acquisition and development of reasoning. It also allows children to discover that there are many strategies for solving problems.

Over time, children can learn to think algebraically. Early exposure to this type of thinking will lead them to a successful future in mathematics.

Observing and listening to children is essential to ongoing assessment that can guide instruction.

Hands-on experiences are incorporated into lessons that teach concepts of Arithmetic, Geometry, Money, Value and Time. Often, one simple exercise can encompass many areas such as: playing "store" teaches children to count money, understand value concepts and also problem solve (especially when a customer isn't happy?) And a favorite - cooking - is one of the best ways to bring to life to the concept of measures.

And Beyond- Learning is fun when you get your hands dirty! We incorporate lots of interactive hands-on activities to get children involved.

Science
Children will begin to understand the relationship between growth and change, observe and make discoveries using all their senses, classify similarities and differences, make predication and explore animals, insect and climates.

Using a calendar is a wonderful entry into the world of science. Learning about the month invites conversation about the seasons and what different seasons feel, look and even smell like. This often transitions into topics of plants and animal development. Expect your child to learn about the importance of protecting the environment while exploring the world around him and far beyond into space.

Here is a sample unit and activities:

"All about Animals" unit- Chick Hatching is a favorite - We celebrate new life as a farmer visits the center to start the two-week project with a short presentation featuring a live hen and rooster! Detailed instructions and activities are included for all children. Hatch one dozen incubated eggs in the classroom and nurture the baby chicks until they return to the farm.

Outer Space - Field trip to the planetarium, Making solar system mobiles, School recycling and green projects

Dinosaurs - Creating plaster of Paris dinosaur eggs, Dig for "fossils" in the sandbox

Insects - Caterpillar cocoons to freeing butterflies, Ladybug gardens, Ant farms

Social Studies
Children develop their community awareness, appreciation of cultural diversity, identify roles people play in society and identify celebrations and holidays. Basic citizenship is explored as they study the flag, learn about the President of our country and Pledge of Allegiance. The travel back in time and discover what life was like for Columbus and other explorers.

"Flat Stanley" is one of the lessons used to teach children about different countries, cultures and the world around us. Far more than just a pen-pal activity, our little friend is sent to family and friends across the world. Students make paper Flat Stanleys and begin a journal with him. Then Flat Stanley and the journal are sent to family and friends across the world for them to treat Flat Stanley as a guest and complete the journal. Flat Stanley and the journal are then returned to the original sender. Students plot his travels on maps, share the contents of the journal and learn about different places and cultures. Often, Flat Stanley returns with a pin or postcard, pictures, souvenirs, and stories as reminders of the visit.

Here is a sample unit and activities:

"A Day in the Neighborhood" - Community Awareness unit-Children explore their neighborhood and learn about the different people and businesses and what roles they play. Visits to the Post Office and with the Postman, Fire Department and Fireman, Bakery and Baker, Library and Librarian.

Multicultural - Through our travels with Flat Stanley, we discover different countries and cultures, and make and taste different foods.

Citizenship - Children learn about basic citizenship as they study the flag, the Pledge of Allegience, and the President of our country. They travel back in time and discover what life was like for Columbus and other explorers of America.

Developmental Milestones

MOTOR SKILLS
Runs lightly on toes
Walks forward sideways on a balance beam
Can hop for six and one half feet
Skips alternating feet
Jumps rope
Skates
Cuts out simple shapes
Copies a triangle
Traces a diamond
Copies or writes first name
Prints numerals one to five and perhaps ten
Colors within the lines
Holds pencil properly
Hand dominance usually established
Pastes and glues appropriately
Copies model of square made with pegs
Emerging awareness of right and left sides

COMMUNICATION SKILLS
Comprehends quantitative adjectives such as pair, few, and many.
Comprehends verb agreement: is and are
Occasional grammar errors still noted
Language is essentially complete in structure and form with correct usage of all parts of speech
Can take appropriate turns in conversation
Communicates well with family, friends, or strangers
Reads by way of pictures
Answers questions directly
Relates fanciful tales in own words
COGNITIVE SKILLS
Retells story from a picture book with reasonable accuracy
May name some letters and numerals
Counts ten objects
Sorts objects by size, color, and shape
Uses classroom equipment such as scissors meaningfully and purposefully
Uses time concepts of yesterday, today, and tomorrow accurately
Begins to relate clock time to daily schedule
Attention span increases noticeably/is less distracted
Learns through adult instruction as well as exploration
Concepts of function improve as well as understanding of why things happen
Completes sequential block patterns, alternating two blocks of one color with one block of another color
Completes a puzzle of a person divided into six parts
Imitates two-step triangle fold
Matches and sorts with paper and pencil marking the one that does not belong

PERSONAL-SOCIAL SKILLS
Dresses self completely/can tie a bow
Crosses street safely
Makes simple sandwiches
Can prepare a bowl of cereal
Brushes teeth independently/can apply paste
Waters plants
Can make simple purchases
Can assist in making bed, setting table, and sweeping
Chooses own friends/may show preference for playmates of the same gender and age
Plays simple table games
Plays competitive games and enjoys sports that require group participation
May be afraid of dogs, the dark, or that mother may not return
Self-centered
Enjoys make-believe play.

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Summer Camp

While pre-schoolers and kindergarteners who are enrolled in Brick Rainbow Kids year-round have tons of fun in our modified summer program, young children ages 3 - 11 come to Rainbow Kids for big-time summer fun.

Our extended-day summer theme camps for older children feature a new adventure every week, from wild west to circus! But no matter what the weekly theme, children always get a healthy dose of old-fashioned summer fun - tossing beach balls, building sand castles and making a splash on one of our waterslides.

You can breathe easy, knowing your child is fully occupied for a fun-filled summer day while you have the time you need to meet your work responsibilities.

 

Additional Programs

Since everything we do at Brick Rainbow Kids revolves around the needs of our parents, we're constantly asking them what we can do to make their lives less stressful, and to further enrich the lives of their children. The resulting additional programs accomplish both!

Parents of older children are always thrilled to learn that Brick Rainbow Kids has wonderful programs for School-Age-Childen during school holidays and breaks - including summer, the biggest break of all! Six to ten-year-olds have their very own Summer Camp.

 

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